Hiring the right video producer for your business video can be stressful. Still, it’s one of the most important decisions you will make when it comes to getting a quality visual project that accurately represents you and your business.

With each passing year, video is increasingly becoming an essential tool to help your future clients find and engage with you. A full 86% of businesses use video as a marketing tool, according to Wyzowl Research’s annual State of Video Marketing Report. Furthermore, 85% of businesses used video as a marketing tool in 2020, 87% in 2019, 81% in 2018, 63% in 2017 and 61% in 2016.

 

93% of marketers who use video say that its an important part of their marketing strategy. This was 92% in 2020, 91% in 2019, 85% in 2018, 82% in 2017, 88% in 2016 and 78% in 2015.

 

The number of businesses using video as a marketing tool has increased by 41% since 2016.

 

The trend is clear. Based on the above, it’s no wonder that video has become the de-facto tool many marketing agencies and marketing directors are using to increase their client’s engagement with their target audience and generate more business. I honestly believe every business owner needs and should have a video. But the question is, where should you start?

 

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Here are the seven things you should do to hire a video producer to create your business video:

  1. Come up with a vision.

In my opinion, this is the most important thing you should do before you hire a video producer. You should have an idea of the type of video you want to create. Do you want your video to be scripted? Do you want your video to have more of a documentary feel? Do you want to do a video walkthrough of your establishment? Do you want your video to be under 30 seconds? Under a minute? Under three minutes?  You don’t need to have all the answers – the video producer you end up choosing can help you out with that. Still, I recommend you have at least a general idea of the type of video you want to create as well as a general look, duration, length and feel. Things will go more smoothly if you have already given this some thought.

Pro Tip: Have a vision, but be flexible. If you’ve never done a video before you might not realize what is realistic. You might have the vision for a Hollywood-style production, but not realize how much it would cost to produce.

  1. Shop around.

Don’t just go with the first Google Search result you find. Spend some time surfing different video producers’ websites. Take a look at their portfolios, read their reviews, and see if they have any testimonials on their site. Is their work cohesive? Is the video quality what you want for your video? Do their mission and values speak to you? Be picky. You are paying for it, after all.

Pro Tip: Look at videos you like from other businesses and reach out and ask them who did their video. Most people will be happy to tell you who created it!

  1. Interview your video producer.

After you have done your homework and compared a few options, have an interview with your potential producer. Ask about their style. Get a sense of why they do what they do. Are they personable and able to put you at ease? This last point is really important as a lot of people don’t feel comfortable speaking in front of a camera. Can your video producer guide you through those sometimes stressful situations and help you feel at ease so you can express in your most natural state? Visuals aren’t everything. Pay attention to how you feel with your prospective video producer.

  1. See if there’s a match between the two of you.

Let’s say you want a fully scripted, professionally acted commercial, but the producer you are interviewing with mostly works with product videography. Or you want a video that focuses only on telling the story of your product or service, but your prospective producer excels at working with people and in creating documentary style videos. If there isn’t a match of your vision and their style, you will not get a video you are proud of and will have invested in something you won’t want to promote. If there isn’t a match of values and vision, it’s totally fine to not work with that prospective producer. Nothing is final until you have signed the contract.

  1. Don’t be afraid to negotiate.

It’s important that you come to the negotiating table with a clear idea of how much you are willing to invest in your video (your budget). Ask your future producer if they can give you some rates based on the information you have shared with them during your interview. If they can’t or need more time to crunch numbers, ask them for a proposal. If you want to work with them but their proposal is above your budget, tell them what your budget is and see if they can match it. Other options include asking them to split payments based on deliverables or ask them if they offer payment plans. See if you can make it work. Sometimes, budging slightly from your budget to secure a filmmaker that will be able to deliver exactly what you want is worth it.

Pro Tip: Just remember, you get what you pay for. If you don’t have the budget for a quality producer, it might be worth waiting until you can afford a video you’ll actually like.

  1. Ask for a contract.

If the monetary investment is right, then go ahead and book that video producer. However, always ask for a contract to protect you and them. Most producers will have a standard hiring contract that should include the scope of work, payment arrangements and delivery times. If they don’t have one, we can provide a standard hiring contract by emailing us at [email protected]. It doesn’t need be a super fancy or formal contract, just get those deliverables in writing and make sure that all parties involved sign two copies of the contract: one for yourself and one for your newly hired video producer.

  1. Let your video producer do what you hired them to do.

You did all your homework and chose the right person for your project. Now, you need to step back and trust them to do what you hired them to do. Some clients like to micromanage video producers and that will just add stress and delays to the production. I know it feels like your video is very precious, but if you followed all the steps outlined in this article, you chose a great person to create your video for you. Be present, ask questions if needed, but let your newly hired video producer do what you hired them to do best.

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I hope this guide is useful to you. If you are interested in learning about how we do things at Emotivo Productions, you can contact us at [email protected]. If you want to see some samples of our business videos, click here.